Brexit's effects on stock markets don't mean what many think they do. In fact, the short term stock market hit is just a sign that investors are figuring out which new, innovative companies to invest in.

The price of a stock is based on two primary factors: risk and expected return. A highly volatile stock with an expected return of 10 percent will be in lower demand than a highly stable stock with an expected return of 10 percent. Thus, while many investors are pulling out, most of that is coming from uncertainty, not from a lack of expected growth.

Much of that uncertainty comes from this: investors don't know which companies to invest in. That's actually a good thing.

When Britain was part of the EU, it was easy for investors to know which companies to invest in. They just had to look at the big, politically influential companies. Those are the ones with growth opportunities, since those are the ones that can manipulate EU policy to get unfair advantages. Those companies are huge and easy to find.

Now everything is changed. The best companies are no longer the ones with the most EU influence. They are the ones who are the most innovative and productive. The problem: right now, investors have no idea who the hell those people are. Is it the small family owned business that no longer has to follow EU restrictions? Is it the teenager whose brilliant idea no longer requires EU approval? Is it the group of university students whose startup can go ahead without EU permission?

During the next four years, Britain has the opportunity to allow natural innovation cycles to take place. During this time, venture capitalists will be looking for the next great ideas from the nation that produced Adam Smith, Newton, and Dyson.

Stock markets will probably pick back up, as investors find the market entrepreneurs who innovate goods and services, and leave the political "entrepreneurs" who just find ways to get unfair government favors. Although, in frankness, the non-producers in the stock market matter far less than the productive individuals and businesses who generate products and services.

If Europeans are lucky, other nations will follow England's lead. Instead of a single, oppressive, overbearing, monolithic government, Europe could have 30 laboratories of innovation. And within each country, entrepreneurial innovation would be a lot easier.

In Liberty,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee