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England

Brexit: Breaking up the Cartel

Monopolies are bad for consumers, because they increase price, decrease quality, and reduce choice. Cartels do the same. When a group of businesses work together to reduce consumer choice, it hurts consumers by lowering quality, raising price, and restricting choice.

That's equally true for countries. A large number of small countries, all competing with each other, is great for individuals. Individuals (and businesses) can choose where to go, based on the regulation, taxes, etc. of the country.

The EU is functioning as a cartel. High, uniform regulations and massive fees apply to everyone in the EU. And businesses and entrepreneurs cannot simply go to a neighboring competing country, because that country has the same restrictions.

Brexit is the first step to breaking that cartel, and eventually creating more choice. As the EU breaks apart, countries will engage in regulatory competition. That means that they will compete to have better, more attractive laws to attract the most productive people.

A single European cartel is good for large, politically powerful businesses that seek to politically and unfairly control the marketplace. It is good for politically powerful unions, who increase costs and hamper productivity. But is is bad for everyone else. The rest of us benefit from regulatory competition.

When countries compete for productive citizens, all productive citizens win. It gives us better options and more choices.

Imagine if governments had to compete for productive citizens by lowering taxes and reducing regulations on entrepreneurs. There would be more jobs and a better quality of life. Brexit is the first step in that process. I encourage productive individuals in all other EU nations to push for referendums, and to vote to leave.

In Liberty,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee

Brexit

What an historic day, as the UK decides to throw off the shackles of EU regulation, fees, and socialism. Britons will no longer have to pay for the incompetence, welfare, government pensions, and socialist policies of the rest of Europe.

Britain now has the opportunity to become a bastion of trade, innovation, and business growth. But that won't happen without work.

I ask my British friends, to first beware of cunning workarounds. The proponents of cronyism and socialism will now try the following. They will use economic scare tactics to try to browbeat you into accepting a new agreement...that will look the same as the old agreement. Fight that. While your economy transforms over the next months, there will be rocky times. That's what real economic growth, the kind that comes from productivity and innovation, looks like.

To those who will tell you that England is too small to stand on its own: nonsense. England has the opportunity to be a bastion of free market capitalism in a sea of socialism. What Hong Kong was to China, you can now be to Europe. Let the rest of Europe drown in its regulation, socialism, and unbridled laziness.

Any short term economic difficulty is just shedding a few crony capitalists and economic parasites. If you use this as an opportunity for freedom, innovation, and growth, you will be the great nation you can be.

Keep fighting for the next two years. I promise: this battle is not over. Cronyism and socialism will work hard to find a way to continue. Be fearless; reject any bad deals; and retake control of your own destiny.

Thank you for all the work you have done, and thank you for voting leave.

Respectfully,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee

Freedom and Innovation or Bureaucracy and Slow Growth?

To All My British Friends,

Do you want freedom and innovation? Or bureaucracy and slow growth?

Tomorrow you will chose complete independence, or continued stagnation. You can continue to be dragged down by the rest of Europe's financial incompetence, socialist wastefulness, and meddlesome regulations. Or you can become Europe's prime location for innovation, entrepreneurship, business growth, and new jobs.

The investors who are nervous? Let them be nervous. They don't understand how innovation and entrepreneurship works. They don't know that if the UK leaves, it will become a haven for businesses seeking freer markets and fewer restrictions (i.e., all businesses). They don't know that a Brexit means more entrepreneurship, more jobs, and more growth.

The old, scared investors don't know what entrepreneurship is, or what innovation is. To them, business is just about numbers on spreadsheets. They have never experienced pioneering innovations, brilliant ideas, and the creation of new industries. They aren't entrepreneurs and visionaries. At best, they are financial parasites. At worst, they are the toxic advisors that make you afraid of becoming as great as you can be.

They say Brexit is a risk. Obviously. Innovation and growth always involve risk. In Silicon Valley, Los Angeles, New York, and London, great innovators take risks every day. Those risks create opportunities, jobs, and even entire industries.

Old and frightened investors may pull away from the pound sterling. So what? That just means British exports will increase in the short term.

As for the threats of retaliation from France: first, those are empty threats. They would hurt other countries far more than they would affect you. Realistically, you can expect something like what Switzerland gets (all the benefits, but none of the restrictions).

But even if you get completely shut out: so what? Look at the fastest growing economies in the world. Look at the cities with the most innovation, or the countries with the fastest growth or largest economies. What do they all have in common? They are not part of the EU. As it turns out, no one in history has ever needed France's help to innovate, grow economically, and create jobs.

Tomorrow, please make the UK the haven for innovation and economic growth that it can be. Please vote to leave.

Respectfully,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair, Libertarian National Committee
Entrepreneur, Founder of Vohra Method