Viewing entries tagged
crony

UK: The Potential for Productivity

HSBC has decided to keep its headquarters in London after Brexit. Given HSBC's historical ties to Hong Kong, that is no surprise.

Hong Kong shows that even a tiny island with slightly less government than its surroundings can become an economic powerhouse. Having less government than China turned this island into one of the dominant business, financial, cultural, and trade centers in the world.

Hong Kong's per capita income is around $35k a year. China's is recently UP to a laughable $7k a year.

Hong Kong is full of wealthy and productive entrepreneurs and businesses. The few wealthy in China are largely crony capitalists, skilled primarily at using political connections to get special favors.

HSBC knows this: It won't matter how easy the EU makes internal trade among European countries. It won't matter if the EU develops a single legal code, or a single "simplified" European language. Being absorbed into a single, monolithic, big government, overregulated, cronyist disaster will not help England. Being free to lower regulation, make independent trade agreements, and allow innovation and cultural development will.

China may succeed in reabsorbing Hong Kong, forcing Hong Kong to adopt China's inflationary currency and dumbed down language, in the hope that doing so will bring Hong Kong's skill and wealth into China. But the main advantage that Hong Kong has that China doesn't: less government. If you add Chinese cronyism, state propaganda as "education", and inexplicable central planning (e.g. ghost cities) to Hong Kong, you'll just lower Hong Kong to China's level. Or you might just empty it of talent, as all the productive people leave to seek opportunities where hard work and innovation pay off.

During the last decades, the EU has partially succeeded in doing just that with the UK. It turned one of human history's most vibrant centers of innovation into a backwater of welfare socialism and crony capitalism.

The UK has the incredible opportunity to become Europe's Hong Kong. It must first reject any bad trade deals with the EU. The EU's "free trade" is nonsense. It is, in fact, highly closed trade. It's free trade and movement of labor within Europe, in exchange for massive restrictions on trade and movement of labor from outside of Europe.

The UK should seek trade relationships with productive, capitalist(ish) economies like the U.S., not with Europe's hubs of laziness and socialism. Second, it must reduce its own regulation and taxes. It can become a place that attracts and keeps entrepreneurs and innovative businesses, instead of repelling them as it does now.

If the UK remains courageous, rejects restrictive trade deals with nonproductive countries, refuses to bail out foreign nations, and lowers its own taxes and regulations, it can become to Europe what Hong Kong became to China.

In Liberty,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee

FTSE 100: The Wrong Measurement

Many economic "experts" are fixating on FTSE 100 as the primary indicator of the UK's economy. When the FTSE 100 is down, they panic. When it rebounds, they rejoice.

The fact is: they are looking in the wrong place. The FTSE 100 measures the hundred wealthiest companies - not the 100 most innovative ones. The new, innovative, largely undiscovered small startups will be the drivers of growth in the UK's new, innovative economy. Those businesses are not part of the FTSE 100; most are not publicly traded at all. They are small startups that will be the next large job creators.

The majority of new jobs in America come from small businesses. The same is true in the UK, and will become increasingly true as the UK's economy moves away from large crony capitalists and towards entrepreneurial startups. New jobs in the UK will come from innovative small businesses, not from businesses that have the ability to get special favors from EU regulators.

Some economists have suggested that the FTSE 250, which looks at the 250 wealthiest companies, is a better measure. It might be, but not by much. The companies that will make the UK's new, independent economy great might show up in the FTSE 10,000 (if it existed). But in reality, most of those companies are not even publicly traded.

Some of the FTSE 100 companies are not even UK companies, and are headquartered elsewhere in Europe. Some of the fluctuations in their stock prices simply reflect the fact that without the UK, the lazier economies in Europe will lose one of their biggest crutches. In other words, if their stock prices fall, that doesn't necessarily show a lack of faith in the UK; they show a lack of faith the socialist economies in the rest of Europe. Investors realize that without the UK shouldering a huge portion of the burden (1/6th of the EU economy), the EU won't last.

A government bailout or similar "stimulus" will certainly help the FTSE 100 companies - at the expense of the innovative entrepreneurs who could actually build the economy. It amounts to replacing EU special privileges for large businesses with UK special privileges for large businesses. It creates unsustainable, bailout-based jobs, instead of meaningful, lasting, productive jobs. That's a lateral move at best.

Instead, the UK should reject crony capitalism, eliminate regulations on small entrepreneurs, and reduce the taxes that stifle innovative small businesses. That means more innovation, better products and services, and more real jobs.

If the UK can disentangle itself from the EU crony capitalism and UK crony capitalism, and move towards a capitalist and innovative economy, it will soon see a massive resurgence in jobs and economic growth. This will be true economic growth, without crony capitalist strings attached.

In Liberty

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee

Brexit: Good Riddance Goldman Sachs

Goldman Sachs has threatened to leave London after the UK leaves the EU. That's like cancer threatening to leave your body.

Goldman Sachs is the co-creator of the 2008 American recession, and the primary creator of the Wall Street Bailout, in which hundreds of billions of dollars were stolen from producers and given to financial parasites. They then contributed to the Greek financial collapse.

There are some companies that you just don't want around. Halliburton, Monsanto, and Goldman Sachs are at the top of the list. These companies are rich, but their wealth comes from cronyism and corruption, not from the creation of value.

They are the worst of the crony capitalists. They produce nothing of value, but instead manipulate government into making them rich at the expense of hard working producers.

No country needs companies who get rich off of government sanctioned theft instead of productivity. Imagine how much better off America would have been if companies like Goldman Sachs had not turned a minor housing surplus into a massive financial catastrophe.

As Britain transition from a cronyist, EU economy into an innovative, independent one, it will need great innovators and producers. It will not need reckless financial parasites. It will not need the company whose largest financial success in its history was getting bailed out for its staggering incompetence.

The only possible downside of Goldman leaving London: they might bring more of their people to America. While jobs are usually good, it's never great to have parasitic, crony capitalist, corporate welfare queens around. Maybe we can ask Trump to build a wall to keep them out.

In Liberty,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee

Brexit: Positive Market Readjustment

In a couple hours, you may see the British pound and stock exchanges massively fall. Here's why that's good:

1. For the last several years, investors have been strategically investing in crony capitalists. They have been investing in whichever companies had most political influence to get special favors from EU regulators.

2. With Britain out of the EU, that no longer makes sense. Special favors from EU regulators don't matter as much now in Britain.

3. Investors' first step is to pull money out of stock in those crony capitalist companies. Those corrupt companies just aren't as valuable any more. When investors leave crony capitalists companies, stock prices will obviously fall, and the demand for the pound sterling will also fall.

4. Their next step is to find innovative, productive companies to invest in. It will take several weeks or months to figure out who those companies are. Few investors have been looking, since it didn't matter. In the EU, innovation doesn't matter as much as political influence. But in Britain, innovation will be king.

5. Once investors figure out which new, innovative companies to invest in, demand for British stock and currency will increase again.

As long as Britain can stay competitive by lowering taxes and regulation, its economy will grow. They've thrown off the yoke of the EU. If they can throw off the yoke of their own socialism, they will succeed.

In Liberty,

Arvin Vohra
Vice Chair
Libertarian National Committee